Health

Facts about Chicken
Chicken is a common domesticated fowl, supposed to have descended from the red and gray jungle fowl as per genetic studies conducted in this regard. Chickens were thought to be first domesticated in India, from where they traveled to Persia. From there they reached Greece in 5th century BC. However, some recent evidences suggest that they were first domesticated in Vietnam around 10,000 years ago. Today, they are widely domesticated throughout the world for both meat and eggs, an important source of food. Chickens are not well-equipped to fly long distances like other birds and generally live for about 5 to 11 years. They are generally slaughtered for the meat when they are 14 weeks old.
 

Interesting Health Facts About Chicken

Chicken meat is the most common type of poultry eaten in the world.

Chicken became a popular main dish on the dinner table in the U.S. during World War II due to a shortage of beef and pork.

Raw chicken meat can be frozen for up to two years.

Chicken meat has two to three times as much polyunsaturated fats, which are the "good" type of fat, than most types of red meat.

Chicken is often considered to be one of the safest meat options for consumption, since very little side effects or allergic reactions are associated with its meat.

Chicken innards such as liver, heart and gizzards are also nutritious and often consumed around the world.

Vitamins and Minerals in Chicken

Other than being a protein powerhouse, other vitamins and minerals chicken contains include:

Tryptophan: This essential amino acid is important because it increases serotonin level in the brain and helps us sleep better. It also has antidepressant properties and can make us happier.

Niacin: This vitamin is vital to the skin, digestive tract and nervous system, and research has shown it may help prevent Alzheimer's disease, help convert food to energy, and promote skin repair.

Selenium: Known as an effective antioxidant, selenium can help in the prevention of cancer by repairing free radicals in the body. It also helps maintain normal thyroid functions and the immune system.

Vitamin B6: This vitamin helps with the metabolism of protein and red blood cells, and may prevent heart diseases.

Phosphorus: Phosphorus not only helps synthesize protein for the maintenance of cells and tissues, it also plays a role in the formation of bones and teeth.

 

Chicken Nutritional Information

The table below is for 100 gram serving of chicken that contains 165 calories, out of which 32 are from fat.

Nutrient

Content

Total Fat

4 g

Saturated Fat

1 g

Trans Fat

0 g

Cholesterol

85 mg

Sodium

74 mg

Total Carbohydrate
(Dietary Fiber and Sugars)

0 mg

Protein

31 g


The table below gives the nutrition of chicken cooked by different methods. The serving size for each of these types is 3 pieces.

Chicken Cooking Style

Calories

Protein (g)

Sodium (mg)

Cholesterol (mg)

Total Fat (g)

Chicken breast, baked

180

26

25

80

9

Chicken breast, baked, skinless

120

24

65

70

1.5

Chicken steak, poached

90

18

50

55

5

Grilled chicken breast,
marinated in rosemary
and Balsamic vinegar

110

24

125

65

1.5

Skinless chicken drumsticks

96

18

80

95

4

Skinless baked chicken drumstick

130

23

80

80

4

Baked Chicken wings

190

18

50

115

13

Thigh cutlets, broiled

140

19

40

85

7

Gizzards and heart

120

19

80

235

5

Whole chicken, roasted

200

19

40

90

14


Chicken provides you with vitamins, minerals and proteins. Another important nutritional fact about chicken is that it is low in fats. More than half of the fats it contains, are unsaturated fats, which in fact, help in lowering cholesterol.